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Posts Tagged ‘redundancy’

Redundant Language

Posted by languageandgrammar on March 11, 2009

Just a short, little post today.

It’s absolutely essential that if we want to develop the best ever language skills that we all join together for a brief moment to eliminate all repetitive redundancy that we hear on a daily basis. Consensus of opinion is that good communication is is one of the basic necessities of a confident person; therefore, a  key to person developing better self confidence in himself is learning what’s repetitive and what’s not.

All we need to do is completely immerse ourselves the way those around us speak, and we, over time, can develop better language skills.

–Paul

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Logical Reason

Posted by languageandgrammar on December 10, 2008

Whenever I hear someone give a logical reason, I wonder how many illogical reasons they’ve given.

A reason is the basis or cause of a belief or action, and it’s assumed that that these beliefs or causes are based on logic. We don’t generally make our decisions based on a lack of logic; at least I hope we don’t. That’s why a logical reason is redundant, at least for most of us.

–Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Sherry’s Grammar List

Posted in grammar, humor, language, politics, sports, writing | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Actual Fact

Posted by languageandgrammar on September 15, 2008

A fact is something that exists; it’s reality or the truth.  It’s a fact that the collapse of banks is an indication of a very poor economy.

Actual is an adjective that is used to describe something as existing or being factual, such as The bank actually went bankrupt.

You may notice the repetition in the definitions, and our tendency to use the two words together, as in actual fact, is yet another redundancy in our language.

–Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever;

Sherry’s Grammar List

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Say No to Income Coming In

Posted by languageandgrammar on March 6, 2008

Don’t get me wrong–I’m not saying no to income, but I’m saying no to the redundant phrase income coming in. Income, of course, is money that you receive, which means money that comes to you. In other words, saying income coming in would be the same as saying money coming in coming in.

It’s not more money; it’s just more words.

Note: Many of you may have noticed that we at Languageandgrammar.com did not comment on National Grammar Day on Tuesday. There’s a good reason; actually, there are two possible reasons, and it’s for you to decide which you prefer.

It’s either because it’s always national grammar day at languageandgrammar.com or because it’s a silly occasion after which to name a day. It’s as useful as Frozen Food Month, which, by the way, was February. I hope you didn’t miss it.

 –Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Sherry’s Grammar List

Posted in grammar, language | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

NPR Redundancy

Posted by languageandgrammar on February 19, 2008

Some of the most common grammar errors are those of redundancy. In fact, there are so many such errors that I devoted an entire chapter (Play It Again, Sam) to them in Literally, the Best Language Book Ever.

Examples in the book include: and also, absolutely essential, completely surrounded, and PIN Number. A redundancy that’s common but didn’t make it into the book is referring to National Public Radio (NPR) as NPR Radio.

It should be obvious that the R in NPR stands for radio; therefore, saying NPR Radio is the same as saying National Public Radio Radio. We don’t refer to ABC (American Broadcasting Company) as the ABC Company or LBLBE (Literally, the Best Language Book Ever) as LBLBE Book–although, if you ask me, that’s catchy–so neither should we say NPR Radio.

–Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Sherry’s Grammar List

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Where Are You At?

Posted by languageandgrammar on January 26, 2008

Asking where are you at is a common grammar mistake, and the mistake and error is as obvious and evident as is the redundancy and repetition of the second part of this sentence and complete thought.

More simply–and less redundant–the word where means at what location, so Where are you at is the equivalent of At what location are you at? Ats a problem–if you ask me! Never use where and at in the same question; just ask where are you instead.

I could go on, but I’d hate to repeat myself.

–Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Sherry’s Grammar List

Posted in grammar, language, writing | Tagged: , , , , | 12 Comments »

 
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