Category Archives: grammar

Bring, Brang, Brung, Brought

Bring is an irregluar verb, that is, a verb that has its own particular conjugations rather than following the same pattern followed by other verbs. That irregular pattern might not seem logical to us, or we might not like the … Continue reading

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Do You Bathe or Bath?

A friend of mine once said, “I’m going to bath the dog.” I didn’t have the heart to correct her grammar, but it’s been several years, and it’s still with me. (I know what you’re thinking, but I DO actually … Continue reading

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And Yet, But Yet: Pick a Coordinating Conjunction, Any Coordinating Conjunction

When using but and yet as coordinating conjunctions, you can only use one at a time (otherwise, you’re creating a redundancy for the category of the redundancy category :)). Use either but or yet when conveying two ideas that are … Continue reading

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Is it Beside or Besides the Point?

Beside/besides seems to fall into the same grammar error category as toward/towards, forward/forwards, and backward/backwards. Many people aren’t sure when to use the one with the -s. Beside means by the side of or next to. He sat in the … Continue reading

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Are You Well, or Are You Good?

If you’re healthy, are you well or good? If you’re happy, are you well or good? If you score a lot of touchdowns in football without getting a black eye or a broken leg, are you playing good or well? … Continue reading

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Lose versus Loose: Let’s Lose This Spelling Error

I’ve actually had a couple of readers send me e-mail to ask that I write about the difference between loose and lose. It seems that I’m not the only person to have seen these two spelling errors. When talking about … Continue reading

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Subjunctive Uses I Wish I Were, Not I Wish I Was

Colin Cowherd, January 22, 2008, talking about Tony Dungy coaching in Indianapolis while his family is living in Tampa: If I was a columnist in Indianapolis, I would write about that story. Well, even though I like his show and … Continue reading

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Bring versus Take

Bring and take are easily confused because their meanings are so similar, but the difference is in the perspective. Bring is done toward you, the speaker, as in the song Bring Me Some Water. Anything transported to you is brought … Continue reading

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Rid Yourself of Hisself, Theirself, Ourself, Theirselves, and Oneselves

I’ve already written about the correct use of reflexive pronouns in This Redundancy Is Self-Evident, but several people still wanted confirmation on the use of words such as hisself. The indefinite pronouns are myself, ourselves, yourself, yourselves, herself, himself, themselves, … Continue reading

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Is It Dragged or Drug? Look What the Cat Dragged In

I was horrified to see that an online dictionary is now even mentioning the word drug as a non-standard past tense conjugation of the word drag instead of what it is, which is substandard. I haven’t checked to see whether … Continue reading

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