Category Archives: grammar

The Past of -Cast: Is it Casted or Cast?

Some verbs are regular verbs, which means that they follow a set pattern when forming their tenses (for example, they add –ed when forming the past tense). Other verbs are irregular verbs, which means that they don’t follow those rules; … Continue reading

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Can’t Hardly or Can Hardly: I Can Hardly Stand It

In Shakespeare’s time, double negatives such as can’t hardly were common, but in current standard usage (and by current, I don’t mean that I just made it up this week!), double negatives are substandard grammar. Hardly means scarcely or barely, … Continue reading

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Anyways, Don’t Say It Any Ways You Want

I’ve heard intelligent people—even some with advanced degrees—use the word anyways, which, again, shows that we all make mistakes from time to time. No one is immune. That’s good to know, isn’t it? Anyway, anyways is not standard grammar usage; … Continue reading

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Bad or Badly: Instead of Feeling Badly, Just Feel Bad

Bad is an adjective that is used with linking verbs (verbs of being, such as be, become, seem, feel, taste, look, smell). Don’t feel bad about slamming my hand in the car door; it happens all the time. I feel … Continue reading

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Bring, Brang, Brung, Brought

Bring is an irregluar verb, that is, a verb that has its own particular conjugations rather than following the same pattern followed by other verbs. That irregular pattern might not seem logical to us, or we might not like the … Continue reading

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Do You Bathe or Bath?

A friend of mine once said, “I’m going to bath the dog.” I didn’t have the heart to correct her grammar, but it’s been several years, and it’s still with me. (I know what you’re thinking, but I DO actually … Continue reading

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And Yet, But Yet: Pick a Coordinating Conjunction, Any Coordinating Conjunction

Colin Cowherd Radio Show, January 22, 2008, talking about Tony Dungy: His family lives in Tampa, but yet Tony Dungy is part of a family….     I have to admit that I didn’t actually hear the rest of the sentence. Once … Continue reading

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