Tag Archives: writing

A.M. in the Morning, P.M. in the Afternoon

It seems to me that I hear this particular grammar error more frequently now than in the past. I don’t know why, and it doesn’t really matter; I’m just here to clear things up. Schools will open at 9:30 a.m. … Continue reading

Posted in grammar | Tagged , , , , , ,

The Difference Between Drink, Drank, and Drunk in Grammar

I’ve written before about the past participle of the verb to run; I’ve noticed a similar problem with the pattern of the verb to drink. The present tense of drink is, of course, drink. He drinks eight glasses of water … Continue reading

Posted in grammar | Tagged , , , ,

Using Had: the Past Perfect Tense

A reader wanted to know how to use the word had in relation to verb tense, so I’m going to try to give a simple, short answer to her question. I think what the reader was asking about was the … Continue reading

Posted in grammar | Tagged , , , , ,

Blame it on Lewis Carroll

A reader requested the following explanation: “…Perhaps you can tell me what word is used when a part of one word is combined with part of another word to form a whole new word.” Well, the short answer would have … Continue reading

Posted in grammar, language, writing | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments

Verb Moods: Indicative, Imperative, Subjunctive. What Mood Are You In?

Verbs can have one of three moods: indicative, imperative, or subjunctive. The indicative mood only includes verbs in sentences that are either statements (declarative sentences) or questions (interrogative sentences). It is unfortunate that more people do not live their lives … Continue reading

Posted in grammar, language, writing | Tagged , , , , , , ,

Leave and Let: Either Leave It Alone or Let It Go

Do not mistakenly use let for leave. This leads to another common grammar error in English. Of course, as is true for most words, there are other and nuanced meanings (I’m just going to stick to what is needed for … Continue reading

Posted in grammar | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Past or Passed: When the Past Has Passed

Use past to refer to the time that came before now or to refer to beyond something in distance. His ten years of working for a corporation with a bad reputation is in the past (the time before now). Their … Continue reading

Posted in grammar, language, writing | Tagged , , , , ,

Plural of Mother-In-Law: It’s the Mothers, Not the Laws!

A faithful reader sent a comment about how hyphenated plural nouns such as mother-in-laws and sister-in-laws drives her crazy. She actually said that hearing this grammar error sounds like fingernails on a chalkboard, and since we all know how that … Continue reading

Posted in language | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Is It Have Gone or Have Went?

Don’t get the past tense of the verb to go confused with the past participle of the verb to go. The past tense is went, and the past participle is gone, and each one has a different place in a … Continue reading

Posted in grammar, language, writing | Tagged , , , , , ,

Has Your Curiosity Been Peaked—or Piqued?

I understand why it’s tempting to use the word peak when describing an excited stage of interest in or curiosity about something. After all, a peak is the pointy top of something, so it’s natural to think of a peak … Continue reading

Posted in grammar | Tagged , , , , , | 5 Comments