Has Your Curiosity Been Peaked—or Piqued?

I understand why it’s tempting to use the word peak when describing an excited stage of interest in or curiosity about something. After all, a peak is the pointy top of something, so it’s natural to think of a peak when you think of your interest or curiosity swelling, as in Her eloquent dissertation on the development of 20th century architecture peaked my interest in the topic.

I said that I understood; I didn’t say that it was right. The correct word is pique, as in Her eloquent dissertation on the development of 20th century architecture piqued my interest on the topic or My curiosity was piqued by his subtle innuendo.

Save the peaks for the mountain tops and lemon meringue pies.

For more common grammar errors, refer to Sherry’s Grammar List.

Sherry

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever;

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5 Responses to Has Your Curiosity Been Peaked—or Piqued?

  1. onlinemommy says:

    Thank you! I learned a new word 🙂

  2. Very helpful. Thanks:)

    Who knew?

  3. Bagt says:

    Thanks!! You just saved me an embarrassing moment when writing my Hub on hubpages!!
    whew…..
    http://hubpages.com/hub/treasure-find

  4. affrodite says:

    Thanks! I’m forever on the internet trying to check out little grammar things and your post helped me this morning. 🙂

  5. Pingback: 100 Fun & Informative Blog Posts Every Grammar Geek Should Bookmark | Online Universities

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