Tag Archives: English

It’s or Its: It’s a Problem

Which of the following is/are correct: a.      Its time to correct one of the most common errors in the English language. b.      The problem is that its easy to confuse the two spellings. c.       The English language has it’s share … Continue reading

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Conditional Tense: What Would Have Been

A reader sent me something from a newspaper and said that it sounded incorrect but that she couldn’t quite explain why. The sentence in the newspaper was If the house would have been newer, it would have been demolished. I … Continue reading

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The Past of -Cast: Is it Casted or Cast?

Some verbs are regular verbs, which means that they follow a set pattern when forming their tenses (for example, they add –ed when forming the past tense). Other verbs are irregular verbs, which means that they don’t follow those rules; … Continue reading

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Can’t Hardly or Can Hardly: I Can Hardly Stand It

In Shakespeare’s time, double negatives such as can’t hardly were common, but in current standard usage (and by current, I don’t mean that I just made it up this week!), double negatives are substandard grammar. Hardly means scarcely or barely, … Continue reading

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Bad or Badly: Instead of Feeling Badly, Just Feel Bad

Bad is an adjective that is used with linking verbs (verbs of being, such as be, become, seem, feel, taste, look, smell). Don’t feel bad about slamming my hand in the car door; it happens all the time. I feel … Continue reading

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Bring, Brang, Brung, Brought

Bring is an irregluar verb, that is, a verb that has its own particular conjugations rather than following the same pattern followed by other verbs. That irregular pattern might not seem logical to us, or we might not like the … Continue reading

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Do You Bathe or Bath?

A friend of mine once said, “I’m going to bath the dog.” I didn’t have the heart to correct her grammar, but it’s been several years, and it’s still with me. (I know what you’re thinking, but I DO actually … Continue reading

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Is it Beside or Besides the Point?

Beside/besides seems to fall into the same grammar error category as toward/towards, forward/forwards, and backward/backwards. Many people aren’t sure when to use the one with the -s. Beside means by the side of or next to. He sat in the … Continue reading

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Are You Well, or Are You Good?

If you’re healthy, are you well or good? If you’re happy, are you well or good? If you score a lot of touchdowns in football without getting a black eye or a broken leg, are you playing good or well? … Continue reading

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Lose versus Loose: Let’s Lose This Spelling Error

I’ve actually had a couple of readers send me e-mail to ask that I write about the difference between loose and lose. It seems that I’m not the only person to have seen these two spelling errors. When talking about … Continue reading

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