A Buck Ten Left in the Game

Oy. I don’t know if any trendy announcer-speak is more annoying than the tendency for announcers to start referring to the time left in a game in terms of money, such as There’s a buck ten left in the game. They only seem to do it when there is less than two minutes left in the game (or the first half); it’s always a buck something left (sometimes they even say a buck and change left), but with inflation, it’s likely to spread to two, three, or 10 minutes left soon.

I’ve been trying to decide why I find this so annoying, and I think it’s mainly because it’s just a ridiculous thing to say. It doesn’t make sense. I would never tell someone that I have a doctor’s appointment in five bucks rather than in five minutes because that would obviously be incredibly stupid, but once the clock ticks down to under two minutes in a football game, time and money become the same unit.

I know that they don’t literally mean money instead of time; they’re just following a trend that someone started a few years ago. And I want a name–I need to send a letter of complaint or something. It was probably Joe Time, I mean Joe Buck.

–Paul

Paul’s book–Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Sherry’s Grammar List

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2 Responses to A Buck Ten Left in the Game

  1. I’m glad this didn’t carry over into meteorology. Otherwise you’d hear the weather person saying “It’s gonna be a buck ten in Phoenix tomorrow!”

    Reply from Paul: Good point, Jesse. It’s bad enough that we keep hearing about the century mark by weather men. I always thought that a century was 100 years, not 100 degrees!

  2. David Arthur says:

    My guess is this carried over from the golf course. For at least the last ten years, any distance to the hole between 100 and 200 yards commonly is given in dollar terms. Thus, 165 yards is a buck sixty-five. What bothers me about the use of money with respect to time is that there are 100 cents in a dollar and 60 seconds in a minute: the math does not work.

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