Tag Archives: writing

Lose versus Loose: Let’s Lose This Spelling Error

I’ve actually had a couple of readers send me e-mail to ask that I write about the difference between loose and lose. It seems that I’m not the only person to have seen these two spelling errors. When talking about … Continue reading

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Subjunctive Uses I Wish I Were, Not I Wish I Was

Colin Cowherd, January 22, 2008, talking about Tony Dungy coaching in Indianapolis while his family is living in Tampa: If I was a columnist in Indianapolis, I would write about that story. Well, even though I like his show and … Continue reading

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Bring versus Take

Bring and take are easily confused because their meanings are so similar, but the difference is in the perspective. Bring is done toward you, the speaker, as in the song Bring Me Some Water. Anything transported to you is brought … Continue reading

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Rid Yourself of Hisself, Theirself, Ourself, Theirselves, and Oneselves

I’ve already written about the correct use of reflexive pronouns in This Redundancy Is Self-Evident, but several people still wanted confirmation on the use of words such as hisself. The indefinite pronouns are myself, ourselves, yourself, yourselves, herself, himself, themselves, … Continue reading

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Is It Dragged or Drug? Look What the Cat Dragged In

I was horrified to see that an online dictionary is now even mentioning the word drug as a non-standard past tense conjugation of the word drag instead of what it is, which is substandard. I haven’t checked to see whether … Continue reading

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Dived or Dove: Let’s Dive Right In

Ok, here’s the deal. Dive is a regular verb, and a regular verb makes its past tense form by adding –ed to the end (or just –d if there’s already an –e at the end of the word). The past … Continue reading

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Across, Acrosst, Acrossed

When you have gone from one side of a street to the other side, you have gone across the street—–not acrossed the street, acrosst the street, or acrost the street. I’m not sure how people who use this non-word are … Continue reading

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Random Capitalization

By Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever and Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities I’m not someone who sends a lot of text messages, but I’ve sent enough to understand the need to use short-cuts and … Continue reading

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Communicating with Tact, Confusing Word Pairs, and More

By Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever and Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities Just a quick reminder: This is not the only place where I post my language ramblings. Feel free to check out AIS … Continue reading

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How to Write Good

By Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever and Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities   A friend sent this along recently, and it’s worth a look (and maybe a laugh).

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