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Posts Tagged ‘paul yeager’

The 20 Best Books for Language Lovers

Posted by languageandgrammar on September 30, 2011

Paul Yeager's books

Paul Yeager's books

I recently came across a blog that highlights the 20 best books for language lovers, and I was honored to see that my book (Literally, the Best Language Book Ever) made the list!

If you love language, there are many worthwhile books to consider reading, especially number 18!

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Off Topic: How to Use Snow to Your Advantage

Posted by languageandgrammar on January 20, 2011

By  Paul Yeager, author of Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities

This is completely off-topic, but since so many of us have had to deal with more snow than we may like, I’m here to help.

Use snow as an excuse to get out of something that you don’t want to do in the first place (such as work): Top 10 Snow-Related Excuses.

You’re welcome.

car stuck in snow

car stuck in snow

Of course, if it’s that bad, then you don’t need any excuses!

The above image is from RTE 2fm

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Words Worthy of Being Trashed

Posted by languageandgrammar on January 4, 2011

While I may have written a book on the topic (Literally, the Best Language Book Ever), it’s good to know that I’m not the only one who thinks that some words, phrases, and expressions deserve to be tossed into the nearest dumpster.

Lake Superior State University recently issued its list of banished words. The Web-word “Viral” topped this list (although its usage has now slipped into some mainstream conversations for some reason), with “epic” and “fail” as trash-worthy runners-up.

The university started their tradition in 1976–long before I was on the case. The redundant and wordy way of saying “now”, “at this point in time,” was the 1976 winner.

Read the entire article on yahoo news.

Oh, did I mention that I wrote a book on the topic? (Reminder–promotion doesn’t have to be subtle–ha!)

Literally the Best Language Book Ever

Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

–Paul

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White Christmas for Many This Year

Posted by languageandgrammar on December 20, 2010

By Paul Yeager, author of Weather Whys: Facts, Myths and Oddities

I know that I recently talked about the fact that not everyone celebrates Christmas, but I don’t think that means the holiday should be ignored.

Many people care about Christmas, and many of those care about whether it will be a white Christmas–even those who typically despise snow.

From a weather perspective (remember, I’m a meteorologist, too), many of us will, indeed, have a white Christmas, which is defined as having at least an inch of snow on the ground on Christmas day.

It does not have to be snowing on Christmas day–just snow on the ground.

For details, read my AOL News article, Widespread White Christmas Expected Across US, for details.

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Language And Grammar Resources (and More)

Posted by languageandgrammar on November 9, 2010

In case you hadn’t noticed, we changed the look of the blog recently. The most recent template didn’t highlight the pages on the site as well as this one does, so let me introduce (or re-introduce) some of the pages here.

  • Sherry’s Grammar List: This is a list of common grammar errors that Sherry Coven has written for the blog. This is the most popular page on the site.
  • Paul List: This is a list of Paul’s entries (not completely updated yet), which includes more language than traditional grammar posts.
  • We have a book dedicated to Paul’s book as well: Literally, the Best Language Book Ever.
  • Finally, we have a page of language pet peeves contributed by our readers (Note: The comments section for this page is closed): Your Pet Peeves.

Paul Yeager is also a meteorologist and has done quite a bit of writing related to the weather, so we wanted to share those resources as well.

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Interview: A New Definition, Thanks to Randy Moss

Posted by languageandgrammar on November 1, 2010

By Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

I love it when professional athletes talk. If it’s not a humorous mixture of mangled cliches and mixed metaphors, then it’s some outlandish, self-centered statement that only a media person trying to make a name for himself is interested in hearing.

Now, one  professional athlete, Randy Moss, has decided to redefine the word interview:

If it is going to be an interview, I am going to conduct it. So, I will answer my own questions and ask myself the questions and give you the answers. So from here on out, I am not answering any more questions the rest of this season.

Interview used to mean “a meeting or conversation in which a writer or reporter asks questions of one or more persons from whom material is sought for a newspaper story, television broadcast, etc.”

Now, thanks to Randy Moss, it’s a one-man show!

Maybe Randy will also redefine the word pompous to mean “regard with the utmost esteem.” If he does, then he’ll have plenty of company from the world of professional sports.

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The Point is Mute

Posted by languageandgrammar on August 18, 2010

By  Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

This is another example of what I like to call “Close but no cigarette.”

I don’t remember where I heard it, as a good blogger should, but I recently heard someone on the television say the incorrect “the point is mute” instead of the correct “the point is moot.”

The point is moot, of course, means that the point has no practical significance. For instance, the point about how to spend the holiday bonus is moot after being fired from the job.

The point is mute would mean that the point cannot speak, which is the case for all points.

I know. I know. Common usage has most likely blurred the two, and if a mistake made often enough is reason for you to accept something, then this post is mute.

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Breaking News: Bank Robber Decides to Not Wait for Police

Posted by languageandgrammar on July 16, 2010

By Paul Yeager, author of Literally, the Best Language Book Ever

Headline in today’s Daily Collegian, which is the excellent student newspaper at Penn State: Bank Robber Flees Scene.

I have to admit that I was not surprised by that–rarely do you find a bank robber who decides to wait around for the police to show up.

Seriously, the Collegian is great–often with better writing and reporting than the local paper–but that headline was too funny to pass up.

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Common Grammar Errors

Posted by languageandgrammar on June 16, 2010

Since we changed the design of the site, I know that some of our other pages are not as obvious as they were in the past, but they’re still there, including:

  • Sherry’s Grammar List, which includes a heavy dose of grammar-related entries. This is (by far and away) our most popular page on the site.
  • Your Pet Peeves, where you can add your pet peeves to the growing list. (Note: This page is not intended to be a discussion forum; rather, it’s intended to be a list of pet peeves.)
  • Literally, the Best Language Book Ever, which gives information about Paul Yeager’s first book. Information on his second book can be found on his weather blog, Cloudy and Cool.

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Warmer and Colder Temperartures

Posted by languageandgrammar on April 7, 2010

I’m a meteorologist and author (Weather Whys: Facts, Myths, and Oddities), and I know I’ve said it, but, technically, temperatures cannot be warmer or colder.

A temperature is a number, which means that it can be higher or lower, not warmer or colder. One hundred is not warmer than 20, and 20 is not colder than 100.

As far as the air is concerned, it is indeed warmer at 100 degrees than it is at 20 and colder at 20 degrees than it is at 100; however, the numbers themselves are either higher or lower. Therefore, technically, we should say that the temperatures are higher or lower, not warmer or colder.

–Paul

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